Short Stories & Flash Fiction
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(Visdare Prompt 29)

She had cut short both her hair and hems. It made no difference. No matter how much she drank, how much she smoked, how fast she danced-

She was still trapped.

Then Jonathon got tied up with the wrong sort and ended with police sirens, desk drawer hand-gun and temple markings.

That hurt; she had loved him after all.

When she found his dairy and Friday nights at Barbers with initialled names that hid no one identities, she knew who the wrong sort were.

She’d kept Jonathon’s gun.

This was a different sort of freedom, one that came with photo smiles and determination that come Saturday morning… the nation would read her name.

This entry was posted in: Short Stories & Flash Fiction

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Carol Forrester is a writer trying to be a better one. She’s currently working on a poetry collection 'It's All In The Blood'. She has a 2:1 BA degree in history from Bath Spa University, enjoys judo at least twice a week, and tries to attend poetry events around the Midlands when she can. Her flash fiction story ‘Glorious Silence’ was named as River Ram Press’ short story of the month for August 2014 and her short story ‘A Visit From The Fortune Teller’ has been showcased on the literary site Ink Pantry. Her poems ‘Sunsets’ and ‘Clear Out‘ were featured on Eyes Plus Words, and two of her poems were included in the DVerse Poets Pub Publication ‘Chiaroscuro’ which is available for purchase on amazon. More recently her poem ‘Until The Light Gets In‘ was accepted and published at The Drabble and her poem ‘Newborn’ was published by Ink Sweat & Tears. She has been lucky enough to write guest posts for sites such as Inky Tavern and Song of The Forlorn and has hosted a number of guest bloggers on her site Writing and Works.

4 Comments

    • Thank you, the piece is really too late to submit for the prompt but I love the picture and struggled to find something to write. In the end I remembered that the ‘flapper’ era was supposed to symbolize women’s emancipation, but that doesn’t mean women were really free. The story just flowed from there.

  1. Really managed to get a twenties kind of noir vibe in this, which I love. The only issue I had with it was this part, “…initialled names that hid no one identities…” That may be completely intentional, but doesn’t hurt to ask.

    • I meant as in writing names as initials in diaries in the hope it will keep people’s identities secrets but being able to tell who the person meant anyway.

Please take the time to tell me what you think, I love receiving feedback. :)

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