NaPoWriMo Day Twenty-Three

So today it is 400 years since Shakespeare’s death. I absolutely adore Shakespeare and have done for a long while.

One of the first dates that the fiancée and I went on was to watch a live screening of Macbeth, directed by and staring Sir  Kenneth Branagh. It was utterly brilliant and the setting they used, a de-consecrated church, really added to the production. I also have the 2015 film version of Macbeath downstairs which I’ve been trying to make time to watch. I think today would probably be a good day for it.

For today’s NaPoWriMo prompt, we have been challenge to write a sonnet. An apt prompt in view of the significance of the day. I have tried writing a sonnet before and it’s not a form that I find very easy. As someone who doesn’t tend to use rhyme much I feel like too much of my focus goes on getting the structure right instead of the poem.

But, I have managed all of the other NaPoWriMo prompts and it is Shakespeare’s birthday. So, I’m going to set the poor man rolling in his grave, with my attempt at a Shakespearian sonnet.

Ten Past Midday – A Sonnet

The hallway clock just stuck ten past midday

yet here I lie still in sheets tossed and creased

wondering what words might have made you stay

and what other women sleeps with my beast.

In your pillow I can still see the shape

of your cheekbone resting against cotton,

eyelashes dark on skin and mouth agape

unaware I was to be forgotten.

Without the heat of you this air feels cold

and I am left reaching for ghosts to hold.

5 Comments

  1. I was reminded of a poem by John Keats who in a poem explains the “sonnet” form and the difficulties in being natural in a constrict form. The poem is “If by dull rhymes our English must be chain’d” and was brought to my attention by the blogger Aquileana who blogs on Greek mythology

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