Poetry
Comments 25

Count It On My Hands

I’ve started gathering my grandmothers on my fingers. Ba was first to claim her place as right-hand woman. The signet ring’s a little worn but sharpened almost to a blade’s edge. Her wit used to have the same bite if you weren’t careful. She’d slash you with her words and have you bursting with laughter all in a matter of seconds. Something of a frail bulldozer, unstoppable at times, but even her initials grew faded past the point of a stranger’s recognition.

Granny Kitty is a new addition. I don’t know how she’d fair with the idea of taking up residence on a middle finger but she wasn’t one to back down when the blood began to rise. ‘Up like a light’ my mother says. That was the Irish in her, and the feminist who brought the shields to defend her granddaughters going to university. Independent, clever, funny, tenacious, but most of all loving.

The dandelions

and the daffodils grow still.

Even without Spring.

dverselogo

It’s a free-for-all at the dVerse Poets Pub this week and this I haven’t written a Haibun for a while I thought I’d include two of the people who’ve had the biggest impact on the woman I’ve become and two people I’ve unfortunately lost of the last couple of years.

 

This entry was posted in: Poetry

by

Carol Forrester is a writer trying to be a better one. She’s currently working on a poetry collection 'It's All In The Blood'. She has a 2:1 BA degree in history from Bath Spa University, enjoys judo at least twice a week, and tries to attend poetry events around the Midlands when she can. Her flash fiction story ‘Glorious Silence’ was named as River Ram Press’ short story of the month for August 2014 and her short story ‘A Visit From The Fortune Teller’ has been showcased on the literary site Ink Pantry. Her poems ‘Sunsets’ and ‘Clear Out‘ were featured on Eyes Plus Words, and two of her poems were included in the DVerse Poets Pub Publication ‘Chiaroscuro’ which is available for purchase on amazon. More recently her poem ‘Until The Light Gets In‘ was accepted and published at The Drabble and her poem ‘Newborn’ was published by Ink Sweat & Tears. She has been lucky enough to write guest posts for sites such as Inky Tavern and Song of The Forlorn and has hosted a number of guest bloggers on her site Writing and Works.

25 Comments

  1. hayesspencer says

    Oh I like this! The two grandmothers – so much hope and strength in this haibun. I’d like to think my grandmother played a major role in the me that is now. Good write! The haiku is beyond excellent.

      • hayesspencer says

        I know mine were! Of course we all lived together in a big old house so I was blessed with having one set of grandparents always around.

  2. I truly enjoyed learning about your grandmothers through the first parts of your haibun. I love the pure simplicity of your haiku!

  3. Your grandmothers sound like strong women. You clearly received much more than rings for your fingers from them. Receive peace when you think of their lives. Wonderful haiku!

  4. As I understand it each grandmother gave you a ring of theirs for you to wear. That would be a nice remembrance of them.

  5. This is a beautiful write to your grandmothers….the prose and the haiku. I feel as if I’ve been allowed to peek a bit into a family diary through your words. Beautifully written! Thank you!

  6. Your grandmothers sound like remarkable people. The haibun is lovely. I like the “missing” and the love and the sweet humor. The haiku is lovely, the spring flowers still growing.

  7. Pingback: Count it On My Hands – SEO

Please take the time to tell me what you think, I love receiving feedback. :)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.