All posts tagged: author

Not A Word To Waste, The Horror Of Redrafts #WeekendCoffeeShare

This weekend the NYC Midnight Flash Fiction Challenge is taking place. Last month I posted my entry for the second challenge of the first round: Stolen Silence and at the moment I’m working on redrafting my submission for the first challenge of this year’s first round. Redrafting is the part of the process where you quite often find yourself doubting that you have any ability to put one work in front of the other at all. You find typos, spelling mistakes, words that you didn’t even know existed. Tenses switch back and forth, character names suddenly change, and out of nowhere you move from mountains to city surroundings. Editing is where all your mistakes come to the forefront and you have to go back and fix them. If you’re luck you will have brilliant people who will help you with your redrafts and edits. These people (if you can find the ones that will give you an honest review rather than just ‘yeah mate, good job’) are invaluable for getting your past that snow-blind stage …

Shadow Dawn Snapshot And Rejection Blues

There had been little warning and no defence. From the saddle of her horse Tara could see the bodies lying around the village, their corpses moved to create a macabre circle around the cobbled together cottages. The ones who still had hands, lay with them folded across their chests. The ones who didn’t… Tara turned her head away. ‘My Lady?’ The soldiers shifted behind her, their mounts unnerved by the tension. ‘Bury them,’ she ordered, and wheeled her horse away from the carnage. ‘But my Lady!’ He was young, his cheeks still a little chubby and Tara could see where he’d gnawed his bottom lip raw. ‘The curse.’ Ilia spat and the boy flinched. ‘There’s no curse,’ said Tara. ‘Bury them as they should have been already.’ Her horse started forward with a slight nudge from her heels. ‘Keep your eyes open when you’re down there though.’ The soldiers bowed their heads and complied, even the boy, though Tara could see him chewing his lip. ‘Children.’ Ilia shook her head. ‘He’s been listening to the …

Sarina Langer: Inside The Writer’s Head

This year Writing and Works has been embracing guest posts like never before. April saw a wonderful collection of bloggers talking about poetry and what it meant to them, with May slipping away already, we turn now to fiction and novels. Sarina Langer has just published her fist novel ‘Rise of The Sparrows’ and has been lovely enough to agree to write a guest post about writing and what she has learnt about the writing process. You can find more about her and her book at http://www.sarinalangerwriter.com and find ‘Rise Of The Sparrows’ on the Amazon store. When Carol asked me if I’d like to do a guest post for her blog, I knew immediately what to write about. I started my own blog nearly a year ago, and it’s also nearly a year since I started to take writing more seriously. I’ve learned a lot since then, and have enjoyed every second. … Well. Almost every second. I’ve always enjoyed writing, but over the past year I’ve really thrown myself into it and embraced every …

Novel Update

This week has not been easy for me and I would like to open this post by thanking everyone who commented on Tuesday night’s post. Your condolences and thoughts meant a lot and it was wonderful to receive such a level of support. Moving on from my personal issues, let’s talk about Darkened Daughter and my utter uselessness at keeping up with Deadlines. I was going to attempt Nanowrimo this month to see if that would encourage me to get the second draft completely written by the end of November but clearly that plan fell through the floor. Simply put, I’ve barely written all month. It’s not that I don’t want to, it’s just that I don’t know what I’m supposed to be writing. Anyway, I’m trying to be proactive and this evening I’m working on the first chunk of the book which is Tara’s infiltration of Turnkay’s Keep in the Witch Moors. At the moment the main aspect missing from Darkened Daughter is character development so that is what I’m trying to resolve. In …

First Draft Done… Sort Of

So I’ve managed to do it! I’ve completed a first draft of a novel for the first time in my life. Whoohoo! Lets throw a party. Okay, let’s not throw a party just yet, the hard bit is just around the corner. Yes, I have 52,000 words of writing that sort of follows a plot line and gets my characters from where I wanted them at the start of the book to where I wanted them at the end of the book. Yes, all my characters have appeared in that 52,000 words. Yes, most of the major events have been included. NO. The last chapter has not been written. The character development has as much meat on it as an emancipated stick-man. Most of the characters barely do anything except those major scenes and the rest seems a lot like fluff without much relevance. Result: Redrafting is needed in abundance. But on the bright side. I’ve written 52,000 words so I have something to work with. Maybe I will throw myself a small party. I …

Dealing With A Bad Review

There are more than a few days when I wake up and wonder if my little foray into self-publishing was an utter mistake. Then I remember that there was a purpose behind choosing that option for Before The Words Run Out and even if the bad reviews leave me feeling like someone has filled my insides with snakes, there were some good reviews as well. I went into self-publishing with no idea what I was doing and most importantly, no editor. That was clearly a big mistake and not one I would be quick to make again. Despite spending hours pouring over my work it is still clear that I needed someone there to pick out those twinges that I still missed and to push me harder with the poems that didn’t come up to standard. This morning was the first day in months that I actually went on amazon to check out my book in order to pull out a link and update my Linked In account. I assumed that like me, most of …

Oh Look. I’ve Run Out Of Rope… Drat.

I Just wrote myself off a cliff. Well sort of. Darkened Daughter is now 500 words away from the halfway point and I thought I knew what was going to happen in every chapter between now and the end. Apparently this was not true. I did not know what was going to happen, because my sneaky little brain decided to derail things and throw up a new event that now means one of my character will be out of commission for a couple of chapters. This mean I can’t write chapters eighteen and nineteen as planned, because it simply won’t make sense.  Replanning is now required. Of course I knew that this would happen. It always does when I try to write something. I’m also aware that every single chapter I’ve written so far is too short for its content, bar one that is just short full stop but somehow works. Redrafting will probably have this novel reaching far beyond its 80,000 word target, but I’m not going to say that’s a bad thing because …

What Not To Do When Sending Off Your Manuscript

Originally posted on A Writer's Path:
? All right, as some of you know, I recently did some work for a publishing press. What I did was read unsolicited manuscripts (stories sent by authors with no agent) and decide if my boss should read it and publish it. During the weeks I spent doing this, I came to discover that authors really do have the worst habits. Everything below is something an author has done and that I’ve read first hand. In order for you to do better, here’s my advice: ? Names: For god’s sake, put your name on your submission. Holy s***, why is this something I actually need to say?! Write? Your? Name? With? Capital? Letters? You guys, this is a joke. It should be “John Smith”, not “John smith”. If you are sending in more than one submission, do NOT change your name on each submission. I’ve seen authors go from “John Smith” to “J A Smith”. Please don’t. (Note that this does not include pseudonyms, which are entirely different.) Additionally,…