All posts tagged: non-fiction

Finding Focus – #WeekendCoffeeShare

If we were having coffee, well first of all I’d have to offer an apology, this weekend seems to have gotten away from me. Sunday evening has crept up and before I really understood what was happening, the weekend is pretty much over. However, I feel like I’m ending on a positive note. On Saturday I ordered a copy of Stephen King’s book The Gunslinger and today it arrived. I was surprised by how thin it was, curiosity led me to google, and I went in search of the exact word count of the book. Turns out that it only just breeches the 60,000 word mark. Now, for the past six months I’ve been worry about the length of my book. The bulk of the fantasy novels that I own stretch into the 200,000 to 300,000 word mark and I was concerned that Shadow Dawn wouldn’t be a long enough book. However, it’s already longer than ‘The Gunslinger’ and I think I might be putting too much focus on word counts and chapter lengths. I …

Drawstrings

My chest has drawstrings. Some days they pull so tight my lungs cram up into my throat. They stop words from forming, keep me from telling you why I can’t keep my hands still or quite catch my breath. They keep me trapped, alone. Quadrilles are perhaps my favourite form of poetry at the moment. They’re short, sharp, and oh so punchy. Tonight’s prompt from the dVerse Poets Pub is to write a quadrille using the word ‘fear’ as your inspiration. Unfortunately this is a word I have a fair amount of experience with, I’ve let anxiety box me into corners more often than I like to admit. If you want to join in then click the badge above and check out the pub and all its patrons. I’ve no doubt they’ll be overjoyed to meet you.

Make Way For The Blonde Bombshell Going For The Try!

I make no secret of it, rugby is about the only sport I’ll sit down and watch, and it’s probably the only one I actually have any understanding of. And that is all because of one insane, wonderful person, Connie Morgan. You know those people you meet and just thing, yes, your mind works in the same weird, eccentric way mine does and we are going to be friend. Meetings in public places become an issue because your weirdness together actually stands a chance of freaking other people out and sending them running. Anyway. This amazing friend of mine has kindly agreed to run a feature here on Writing and Works in honour of the Rugby World Cup. [Yes I know we’re a little late to the game but we got here in the end.] Connie will be joining us once a week to share with us her take on the World Cup and all that surrounds it. As a past player, coach and more importantly, a die hard fan, this girls has blagged her …

Grief

The grief felt guilty. Clawing it’s way up, dragging lung and trachea with it, it seemed confused. Why now, why this loss, why not some other more easily explained? They had through the same trauma, felt their own grief and worry, dealt with it in their own way. They had not been there to see the way in which you dealt, the way in which you coped, the things that kept you grounded. When my Grandfather was very ill a few years ago I stayed at my Gran’s to look after the dogs and my Great-Gran while she spent her time with Grandad at the hospital. My Grandfather’s accident was probably the most traumatic experience of my life so far, and he was very, very lucky to have pulled through. During that time at my Gran’s there weren’t many people to talk to, and instead it was the older dog Bessy who provided the most comfort and reassurance by simply cuddling up next to me on the settee or being in the room. Last night …

A Something And Nothing Post

I want to say it’s been one of those weeks, but really it’s been one of those years. Every time I feel that life has evened out and I can finally get back on top of whichever ‘To Do’ list is currently blue-tacked to the computer screen, something new crops up. I have achieved some of the things I wanted to though. I self-published a poetry collection and managed to sell a few copies. There is still a massive stack sat in on my book case but it’s a start. It’s also available for purchase online at Amazon. [Hint, Hint]. I also joined English Heritage, visiting Morten-Corbet Castle, Haughmond Abbey and Beeston Castle within the last month and coming away with some photographic evidence of my visits, even if fingers do make the odd appearance on the camera lenses. As far as my writing goes things have slowed to an almost halt. I’m trying to work on ‘The Lady Winters’ and ‘Obscruite’ at the same time but neither seem to really be going anywhere fast. …

Bill

I remember you warning me about candles. It was Christmas, (well just before) and I’d used a cardboard trophy box to make my own advent calendar. The sort with a candle for the Sundays and two more for Christmas Eve and the event itself. I think Joanna had made one too and we brought them to show you and Granny, proud of ourselves for putting them together.   You let us light them. But probably only because everyone was stood there and if something went wrong there were grownups ready to leap in and save the day.   I learnt about France after you were gone. Twenty-one with two friends and bikes roaring across the country by yourselves. Gran found the picture, asked for it to be framed.   Seeing you young is strange. It reminds me that my Grandfather was not my father’s father or the man my gran married, he was someone else. Someone who I never saw because I was born too late and the sickness had set in and children that …

Further Maths Is Sound

My sister isn’t a fan of having her photo taken so instead you’re going to get a picture of her lapel. Honestly her lapel is the whole reason behind this blog post, or more accurately, the little silver badge that you can just make out on this exemplary example of my photographical skills. For those of you who did not know, that is the symbol for pi: 3.141…………. If you don’t know it then I am definitely not the best person to explain it to you. But anyway, my sister has it on a badge on her lapel because she decided that Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry were an appropriate choice of subjects for her A Levels. She’s your basic clever clogs who finds numbers incredibly interesting and amusing. So much so that she took Further Maths and bought the lapel pin that are offered to those taking the subject at her school. She also likes baking. Do you start to see what I mean when I say she likes numbers? What I actually …

Dear Ba

    After I posted my entry for Five Sentence Fiction I remember a story my mother had told me about my Great Gran and how went she went ice skating she took a dinning chair with her so she could keep her balance. It struck me that for the prompt ‘frozen’ this would have been the perfect response. So it looks like this week I’m doing two responses and I hope you enjoy this anecdote as much as I did when it was told to me.   Dear Ba, When you were young the village pond would freeze and people went skating. You never struck me as a timid person. Sharp as thumbtacks, formidable wit. Yet I’m told the ice scared you, or at least falling did. So you went skating with the dining chair in front, just in case you slipped.