Speculative Fiction Prompt: March 2022

The first of March almost got away from me! While January dragged on, February seems to have vanished from beneath my feet before I could really get a grip on the month. We had a slight increase in the number of participants for February, so I’ve got some reading to catch up on.

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A large, corked, glass bottle, labelled poison, on a wooden surface in front of a misty landscape.

Speculative Fiction Prompt: February 2022

A large, corked, glass bottle, labelled poison, on a wooden surface in front of a misty landscape.

January is finally behind us! For a month that seemed to last forever, I’m not sure I actually managed to get much done. Ah well, new month, new opportunity to crack on and get some writing under my belt. The theme of this month’s speculative fiction prompt is Poison!

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Speculative Fiction Prompt – January 2022

It’s a new year, and in the spirit of 2022, the speculative fiction prompt is back! On the first of each month there will be a new image for writers to use to inspire work. We accept all styles of writing, be that a poem, a short story, of a chapter for a novel. This prompt was originally the brainchild of D Wallace Peach over at Myths of the Mirror. Writing and Works took over 2019 and it went on hiatus at the start of the pandemic.

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Time Grows Full – A Poem By Carol J Forrester

Pretending to linger
I make a show
of standing on the threshold
one shoulder inside
this room we’ve filled with moments,
cheeks smooshed against windows
limbs spilling, grasping
from cupboards unclosed
and floorboards lifting loose
to show the bodies
no longer hidden, buried beneath.

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#NaPoWriMo 2021 Early Bird Prompt – Weaving Time

When Adam delved and Eve span, who was then the gentleman?

John Ball 1381

There are less of us these days,
the ones with the time to weave history
into cloth.
Once upon, they called this women’s work.
We stitched their names
just the same,
cut their threads to the lengths
they needed to be,
did not cry over the fraying ends
they left behind,
but moved on to the next row
of coloured strands waiting,
to be fixed in place.
Our baskets always bursting
with material for the making,
some scraps we took to our graves
though that tradition is gone as well,
with no one to keep the patchwork growing
so much is lost and moth eaten.

Tiraz Textile Fragmentlate 9th–early 10th century