Poetry
Comments 5

Roots and Branches #DVersePoetics

Half this family tree has been watered

until the branches hang heavy with fruit.

 

We know all the name, if not the faces,

see the resemblance in the variety.

 

On the other side we know much less,

can’t quite feast on what is left.

 

There are wanderers in this blood,

apples that fell far and wide and distant.

 

Strangers in stranger places bobbed,

grew their own trees from loose cores.

 

People put down roots, grew branches,

spread the distance between lines.

 

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This entry was posted in: Poetry

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Carol Forrester is a writer trying to be a better one. She’s currently working on a poetry collection 'It's All In The Blood'. She has a 2:1 BA degree in history from Bath Spa University, enjoys judo at least twice a week, and tries to attend poetry events around the Midlands when she can. Her flash fiction story ‘Glorious Silence’ was named as River Ram Press’ short story of the month for August 2014 and her short story ‘A Visit From The Fortune Teller’ has been showcased on the literary site Ink Pantry. Her poems ‘Sunsets’ and ‘Clear Out‘ were featured on Eyes Plus Words, and two of her poems were included in the DVerse Poets Pub Publication ‘Chiaroscuro’ which is available for purchase on amazon. More recently her poem ‘Until The Light Gets In‘ was accepted and published at The Drabble and her poem ‘Newborn’ was published by Ink Sweat & Tears. She has been lucky enough to write guest posts for sites such as Inky Tavern and Song of The Forlorn and has hosted a number of guest bloggers on her site Writing and Works.

5 Comments

  1. I like the metaphor, and I can relate to how large the tree is, we won’t see the entirety of it. Well written.

  2. I like the description of the family tree as two halves, one watered, known and fruitful and other less so and distant.

  3. Great answer to the prompt, Carol. I’ve always kind of marveled at genealogy buffs and why they are fascinated by the mere bones of their family tree, but rarely ask the questions how and why and go searching for those juicy treasures to which you refer here. I have always maintained that a good quality journal written by a relative is the most valuable heirloom, even legacy.

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